In Pursuit of Justice: Dr. Netta Barak-Corren Offers Behavioral Insights into the Law

Dr. Netta Barak-Corren is a Lecturer in the Faculty of Law with a focus on empirical and behavioral analysis of public law, in particular in the areas of law and religion, equality, and conflict resolution. Her current research focuses on how people make decisions in moral conflicts and on law’s diverse and sometimes unexpected impact on discrimination.

Since arriving at the University, Barak-Corren has spearheaded a new undergraduate program in law and psychology to help students consider the significance of combining these two fields. “This is a natural combination, as law is primarily interested in guiding human behavior for the common good,” she explains.

A former student of Computer Science, Barak-Corren consults on a voluntary basis for Israel’s Ministry of Finance and Ministry of Economy on how to motivate women to pursue STEM education, using behavioral insights.

“Equal opportunity is a topic that has long been close to my heart. I hope that through my work with the ministries, I will be able to assist in the formulation of research-based policy that will get women and minorities into STEM fields,” she says. “I would consider it a success if the government would increase its use of evidence in policymaking as a result of this project. This is perhaps the single most important quality of good governance in our times after honesty, fairness, and accountability.”

A graduate of the Hebrew University, Barak-Corren received her LLB and her BA in Cognitive Science. After clerking for then-Supreme Court President Dorit Beinisch, Barak-Corren did her LL.M. and SJD at Harvard Law School, with her doctoral dissertation entitled When Law and Religion Conflict: A Behavioral Examination. 

Barak-Corren is the winner of numerous grants and awards, including the Next Generation Award, the Sinclair Kennedy fellowship, and the Howard Raiffa and Fisher-Sander prizes.