Leading the Quantum Revolution

Quantum information research is one of the hottest areas in 21st century science, promising dramatic improvements in computation speed and secure communication. Based on the inherent wave-like nature of matter and light, quantum will lead to massive leaps forward in our ability to fabricate, control, measure, and understand advanced structures.

The Hebrew University’s Quantum Information Science Center is Israel’s leading center for quantum information research and development. With nearly 30 researchers specializing in physics, computer science, mathematics, chemistry, philosophy, and engineering, the Center is at the forefront of a new global revolution in the way we think about the world and interact with nature. It is based on the deep understanding that information (in quantum form) is at the heart of our reality, and this has far-reaching scientific and technological ramifications.

Looking Ahead

The outstanding and forward-thinking group of interdisciplinary researchers at the Center believe that the only way to make ground-breaking advances in complex real world implementation and fundamental understanding, is the cross-fertilization between different fields and languages of science.

The Center is encouraging collaboration between faculty members and with international peers by enabling them to form a common language that will lead to joint research and discoveries. At the same time, the Center is planning a shared research and equipment facility, to be used by both students and faculty. To attract top talent and nurture the next generation of quantum scientists, scholarships must be made available.

What is Quantum?

The theory of quantum mechanics states that particles (e.g. electrons) and waves (e.g. light) can co-exist in many different formations. But when measured or observed, they collapse into one of them—either particle or wave. This is quantum uncertainty. In multi-particle systems, the complexity grows exponentially. Quantum theory implies that a single molecule of organic material potentially has more computing power than all of humanity’s supercomputing facilities combined. Quantum systems are steadily becoming more complex, leading to dramatic speed-up in computation and secure communication.

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