"Justice, Justice You Shall Pursue" Deuteronomy 16:20

The Clinical Legal Education Center (CLEC) at the Hebrew University is an integral part of Israel’s flagship Faculty of Law and one of the country’s leading clinical centers. Guided by its philosophy to apply the law as a vehicle for social change and promote justice for society’s most vulnerable groups and individuals, the Center’s activities are based on a two-fold approach: it offers the highest quality legal aid to a wide range of disadvantaged individuals and groups; and it actively engages law students in top-notch applied clinical and practical experience under the close guidance of Clinical Attorneys who are experts in specific fields.

This substantial investment in the Faculty of Law’s students has been proven worthwhile — following graduation, a majority of students remain committed to, and aware of, social responsibility as an integral part of the legal profession.

The Center's Activity

The activities of the CLEC’s 10 clinics comprise three mains fields of activity:

  1. Individual representation of clients in legal and other cases.
  2. Initiating and advancing policy change and legal reform through roundtable discussions and conferences, participation in Knesset and other public committees, drafting position papers and shadow reports for government or international agencies
  3. Education, awareness and empowerment on subjects arising from the Center’s cases and other activities by means of public outreach and educational activities.

“I was exposed to many issues concerning human rights and poverty. The Clinic enriched my legal knowledge, I learned to draft papers and legal letters, and submit court claims — but that wasn’t the main thing I learned. I also gained insight into the bureaucratic difficulties that our clients had to deal with, I learned how to take responsibility for the first time, and of course I got to experience the role of community lawyer, which gave me the taste for more.”

Michael, student volunteer in the Clinic for the Representation of Marginalized Populations

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